Aby-a-Day – Day 202 of 365

As I’ve posted earlier, tomorrow we have an appointment for Angel to see an opthalmologist at Angell Hospital because our regular vet found “deposits” on Angel’s eye during her annual exam.

She lost her left eye to complications from an upper respiratory infection and Feline Herpesvirus when she was still a kitten, and since then her right eye has always been a little cloudy; here’s an accidental close-up photo I took last year that shows the cloudiness on her good eye really well.

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This is a more recent photo which also shows her good eye; to me, the spots look about the same as they did last year. Apparently Dr. Waggener saw something new and referred us to a specialist. So, to prepare for the visit, I did what any 21st century person would do: I Googled “feline cornea deposits.”

First I found this overview of Feline Opthamology with great illustrative photographs on the website of a San Francisco Bay Area veterinary office – fitting since Angel is from Northern California. I also found an article on Feline Eosinophilic Keratitis from the University of Georgia goes into quite a lot of detail. And then there’s this article from the 2001 Small Animal Opthamology Symposium which has a clear description of Feline Herpesvirus-related eye problems, including Eosinophilic Keratitis.

From our vet’s description and what I’ve read, it doesn’t seem to be Progressive Retinal Atrophy, which is a genetic condition frequently found in Abyssinians. It’s so common, in fact, that it was one of the reasons that an Abyssinian was used to sequence the feline genome.

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The spots are much more visible when you get the reflection from the tapetum lucidium, but here is what her eye looks like under natural light.

Of course, until tomorrow morning, we have no way of knowing just what is going on with Angel’s eye, and even after we see the opthalmologist we still may not have an answer. I just hope that it is something that can be managed.