Aby-a-Day – 19 March: Angel at the vet (Medical Monday)

The first time we took Jacoby and Angel to the vet was in September 2016. We went to introduce ourselves (which turned out to be pointless since we ended up going to the other vet in in town), to get a refill of Angel’s Amitriptyline prescription, and to get both Jake and Angel their EU Passports (about which more in an upcoming post).


Angel can be a little skittish and fearful at home, but she loves to explore when we’re at the vet.



She’s so cute when she’s curious.


Before the passport can be issued, the vet needs to scan her microchip to make certain she is really herself and not an imposter. Microchips are much more important in Europe than they are in the States. Besides being listed as the cat’s version of a social security number, they are also required for pet insurance, and every cat’s microchip is scanned when you check in at a cat show.


Yep, Angel is Angel!


Jake is happy to just chill on a chair while Angel explores.


Angel watches as Björn takes Pyret out of her carrier.


While the vet and Björn attempt to have Pyret examined, Angel checks out the floor again.


Abys are so different from other cats at the vet.

Aby-a-Day -18 March: “If you gaze long into an Abyssinian, the Abyssinian also gazes into you” (Swedish Sunday)

This is another post written by my husband, Björn. While Björn has had cats most of his life, he never lived with Abyssinians before…


Before Jake and Angel moved in, the most active cat I had lived with was Olivia (1999-2010), the small tortie shorthaired Norwegian Forest cat mix. She was pretty talkative and active, annoying and fun (usually at the same time). Still, she was nothing compared to cats like Jake, Angel, Alfred and Logan.


Other cats I had met, like those of friends, were pretty sedate, just like my own old cat, Pyret. Some hid under the sofa and refused to come out when I was visiting, others were just furry couch potatoes. I had met Jake and Angel in Boston in 2015, and had seen their antics during our FaceTime sessions before Koshka moved here. I thought I was prepared…


18 June 2016. Two cats are let out of their travel cage and explore their new surroundings. Soon I’ll learn what it means to live with Abys. While Angel is more like a regular cat as long as there’s no meat involved, my old Pyret was the opposite to Jake.


Active, attention-seeking and affectionate (usually), the claim that Abys are the most dog-like of cat breeds is proven true.

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Did I say dog-like? Abys aren’t really like dogs, at least not at the dinner table. Dogs are usually well behaved and just sit there, with sad puppy eyes and whining, hoping for a scrap. Abys, on the other hand… Or paw.

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Living up to the epithet “grabby Aby”. Any plate within the reach of an Aby is fair game, and that reach is considerable. Turn your head for a couple of seconds, and that piece of chicken is gone. Don’t think that just because you’ve stuck your fork in the meat that it is safe.


The Aby looks at it and says: “Is that meat you have on your fork? Mind if I insert my head between your hand and mouth and take it?”


It was rubbing off on my old cat, too. OK, she always had a thing for shrimp off my pizza, but she began to join the other four-legged (or rather two-armed) pests when we had a meal.


She wasn't as aggressive as the Abys, though. The young boys – at least Freddy – have adopted the bad habits of their elders, but that was just a matter of time…


Still, I wouldn’t trade it for anything else. Living with Abys and a Singapura is a whole new experience, and I would never consider one of those decorative but passive breeds that might score first prizes at shows, but which are about as fun as a plushie. With Jake, Angel, Freddy and Logan around, there’s almost always something happening.

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Contrary to what uneducated people think, cats have personalities, and with their intelligence and activity, I would say that Abys are among the most personable of all breeds. That helps now, when my Pyret passed away two weeks ago. To have the other cats around have made the loss a little bit less painful. A home without a cat isn’t a real home.

Aby-a-Day – 7 March: Goodbye, Pyret (Wordless Wednesday)



Aby-a-Day – 6 March: Sketches of Pyret (Cartoon Tuesday)

In anticipation of getting back to doing my full-colour, regular cartoons again, I have been working up “characters” for the new cats in the ensemble cast: Pyret, Alfred and Logan. You have seen some of the preliminary sketches of Freddy and Logan already.


I also worked up a sketch for Pyret. Someday I’ll have to finish this one in colour.

Aby-a-Day – 5 March: Pyret at the vet (Medical Monday)

For a cat who lived such a long life, Pyret only went to the vet a handful of times. When she was young, of course, she got her routine vaccinations and her spaying. And then after I moved her, we brought her along with the Abys. She always hated the vet, and medical attention of any kind (as she demonstrated with alacrity when I gave her that pill one time), so it’s very fortunate that she was very healthy and had good, strong teeth.


She was a good traveller to the vet, anyway.


When we took Pyret to the vet this year, she had a panic attack.


She hyperventilated.


And the vet was very concerned.


Apparently, being examined by a vet threw Pyret into a panic attack.


So I brought Pyret in for her own, private vet appointment.


At the time, she weighed 3.05 kilos. When she died, she was only 2.6 kilos.


Because Pyret was so old, we wanted to get a blood sample to check all her levels. And to do that, we needed to draw blood. And to do that, Pyret needed to be sedated.


The vet used a short-term drug to knock her out.


Once she was unconscious, they worked quickly to get a blood sample.


Ultimately, the results were positive, with some low-grade kidney failure – nothing unexpected in a cat of her age. She was prescribed a special renal/hepatic medicinal diet, but was otherwise given a clean bill of heath

Aby-a-Day – 4 March: Pyret party (Swedish Sunday)

This is the first of (hopefully) many guest posts written by my husband, Björn. In his first post, which was originally written before Pyret died, and revised after she left us on Friday, Björn describes his experience of going from having one elderly cat to living with two active adult Abys and two kittens.


With the passing of Pyret two days ago, I’ve rewritten this piece. My cat is dead. This is who she was, and how she was affected by the four- and two-legged people in her life.


While having a horde of Abyssinians (well, two) descending on you is an experience in itself, it didn’t come quite as a surprise. Not so for my old cat, Pyret. She was an old dame, born in a stable on a farm in 1999, and used to having the run of the house since my other cat, the black tortie Olivia, passed away in 2010. “Pyret” translates as “the little mite,” as she was really tiny when we got her.


Pyret was “my” cat ever since my ex and I got her as a kitten. She liked to be in the bathroom when I enjoyed a soak.



Pyret’s background affected her dealings with other cats. When she was a kitten, she and the rest of the litter was orphaned when they were just five weeks old. My then partner got her a friend (Olivia) a few months later, but they didn’t really bond. Still, Olivia taught Pyret how to cat, like using the litter box and cleaning herself.



Olivia as a kitten, about six months old. She was a talkative and rather smart cat, annoying and amusing at the same time.


Pyret sure was a pretty cat, though, even when age and failing health made her lose weight. Pyret was gentle, and except for a couple unlucky birds and the unfortunate incident with Koshka’s finger, she never hurt anyone. The photo above is from 1 April, 2000, when Koshka visited us.


She took the photo, never expecting that she one day would become Pyret’s mom.


Pyret and Olivia got a new room-mate in 2003, when my son Kalle was born. When we came back from the hospital with our baby, the cats met us at the front door. Kalle cried a little, and Olivia vanished, hiding for a couple of hours, while Pyret showed some interest in the new arrival. Kalle has always had cats around him, and Pyret was like his older sister.


Scruffy, but otherwise in good shape for her age. Her last weeks in life saw her lose weight, and it was heartbreaking to see her waste away.


When she became the sole cat again, she didn’t show any signs of missing company; she was “my” cat, and appeared happy with sleeping and eating and not much more. Her life was uneventful for six years, with not even a visit to the vet.


18 June, 2016. Two cats were let out of their travel cage and began to explore their new surroundings. Pretty soon Pyret and I learned what it meant to live with Abys. While Angel is more like a regular cat as long as there’s no meat (or corn) involved, Jake was the opposite to my old Pyret. There was plenty of hissing and growling; Pyret wasn’t too happy about getting her territory invaded, but with a large apartment (five rooms and kitchen, 120 sq.m./1290 sq.ft.), they didn’t have to share the same space if they didn’t want to. She kind of accepted them after a while, but kept to herself most of the time.


Then, on 6 June 2017 and again five days later, on the 11th: Kittens! Alfred and Logan arrived on the scene. This time, the period of hissing was much shorter. She didn't bond with them, either (although Logan tried very hard to befriend her), but she didn't mind their presence. They mostly left her alone in her favorite spot in a chair next to my computer desk. We were together since the first weeks of her life until the last day of her long life, and I never had a pet this long. While she was far less active than the LunaTicks, she had always been around, and for a long time she was healthier than one would have expected from a cat her age. I counted every year past her 15th as a bonus, but all good things must come to an end. She died at home, surrounded by familiar things. When she had brief spells of cramps, we comforted her. We hope it was a better choice than a trip to the vet and a needle in an unfamiliar room. The other cats appear to understand that she was ill and that she’s gone now, and not just disappeared.


Having the other cats around will hopefully soften the blow, but to me, Pyret will always be #1. Her spot next to my desk is so empty now, and I mourn her. She was like all of us made of stardust, and she was a tiny piece of the universe that experienced itself in the shape of a cat for the 18½ years she graced this world.


When she died, a friend wrote this:

“Att somna från alla sina liv. Tassa rakt in i evigheten. Bo i hjärtan. Spinna i minnet.”

Translation: “To leave all lives in the sleep. Pad straight into eternity. Live in hearts. Purr in memory.”


Björn’s early photos of Pyret and Olivia can be found here (ignore the broken thumbnails – they still lead to the photos).

Aby-a-Day – 3 March: “Some are born Abys, some achieve Abyness, and some have Abyssinians thrust upon them”

Shortly after Pyret was born, her mother disappeared, and her litter would have died if not rescued and bottle-fed. While Pyret had her littermates for a short while, she never had an adult cat to serve as teacher, mentor, and example. It wasn’t until Olivia arrived that Pyret learned any semblance of how to cat.


But then Olivia died in 2010, and Pyret was an only cat for six years before having her live invaded by two Abys.


Another year after that, another Aby and a Singapura were added into her household.


She hissed at them – a LOT – and she only cuddled or slept with Logan (because Logan never takes no for an answer), but I think part of her was happy to have other cats around. Maybe she would have preferred to have few cats sharing her home…


…but she clearly decided that they weren’t all bad.

And Björn noticed that the LunaTicks had a definite effect on Pyret.


Before she was invaded by the ticked horde, she never begged for food when Björn was eating or preparing a meal…unless he was eating a pizza with shrimp on it.


But after the Abys and Logan arrived…


…she started picking up their bad habits.


Cats learn by observation and example, and Pyret was quick to adopt the ways of the LunaTicks.


Who says you can’t teach an old cat new tricks?


Whenever any cat hears us cutting something in the kitchen, they come running in the hopes it may be meat.


We had a smoked lamb leg at New Year’s, and whenever we took it out to cut some meat off to eat we were swarmed by the LunaTicks…


…and also Pyret.


While she may not have been as proactive as the Abys and Logan in asking for bits of meat,


she was definitely a participant in the Hunger Games.


One fun thing we do with the cats is we play the “Hunt Crunchies” game. It’s simple to play: get some dry food and toss it, one piece at a time, and let the cats “catch” it.


The competition can get quite stiff.


The Abys, especially, are treacherous opponents, as they use their quick hands with impunity. That, and they are so food-oriented!


But even against the hungriest Abys on earth (Alfred and Jacoby), Pyret held her own. These last photos were only taken six months ago, and she was right there in the middle with the boys, catching crunchies!